Hi, we're also available in English.

Hallo, wir sind auch verfügbar in Deutsch.

Hola, también estamos disponibles en Español.

Bonjour, nous sommes également disponibles en Français.

Ciao, siamo disponibili anche in Italiano.

Hey, we zijn ook beschikbaar in het Nederlands.

Olá, também estamos disponíveis em Português.

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Naples
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What to do in Naples

Language

Italian

Currency

Euro (€)

Dialing code

+39

Time zone

Central European Time (CET)

Getting around

This medieval city has plenty of cobbles and cracks to kill your feet, but strap on some sturdy sneakers and get ready to walk. Most cultural and historical must-sees in Naples, with the exception of Pompeii, Herculaneum, and Mount Vesuvius, are within a 3km radius. There’s good public transport too, so hopping on a bus, subway, funicular railway or tram is easy. A hop on, hop off tour is a great option for saving time and money as most offer three different routes around the sights for one price.

Weather

The best time to visit Naples is April-June and September-October, when temperatures are less likely to have you melting as fast as your triple scoop of gelato. Even Italians try to avoid being around the city in August. New Year's Eve in Naples is known for being a blast, literally - the city is proud of hosting the best fireworks in Italy. November makes for cheaper hotels and quieter attractions, but pack some warm clothes and a hat, as the nights can be cold with a mean icy wind blowing in off the Med.

Mount Vesuvius

Vesuvius isn’t just the name of a really spicy pizza. This ferocious volcano can be accessed from Naples via a rickety commuter train, or by taking a tour. It famously erupted in 79 AD, swallowing Pompeii and Herculaneum in one ashy gulp and killing an estimated 10,000 to 25,000 people. While Mount Vesuvius is sleeping, travellers hike all the way to the summit along a rocky, winding road. It’s a steep and punishing stroll but don’t worry, there are plenty of people handing out walking sticks.

What to do in Naples

Eat your weight in babà

Babà is as much a part of Neopolitan culture as its famous pizza and coffee. A mushroom-shaped sweet soaked in rum or limoncello, it's even seeped into everyday language. If you have a particularly sweet personality, locals won't hesitate to say “si nu' babbà” (you're a baba). Originally from Central Europe and enjoyed by Naples' high society, this is a no-nonsense pastry that's all about the taste. Eat it on its own while you take a walk through Naples' bustling streets. A true Amalfi Coast staple to enjoy on the go!

Escape the city

Craving some waves? Capri, Sorrento and the Amalfi Coast are all easy to reach from Naples. All year round daytrippers flock to the seaview cafes and boutiques to spend their Euros and to gawp at the rich and famous who for decades have treated this area as a playground. From Capri’s lemon groves and bougainvillea-clad terraces to the Almafi’s curving coastal roads and dramatic cliffs, there’s a photo op around every corner.

Get archeological

Naples' National Archaeological Museum offers history fans what is arguably the world’s finest collection of Greco-Roman artefacts. Inside you’ll find treasures from Pompeii and Herculaneum, marble sculptures, the famed Toro Farnese (Farnese Bull) and amazing mosaics from Pompeii's Casa del Fauno. Make sure you visit the Borgia collection in the basement and, for lovers of erotic art: the Secret Room is a must-see.

See how the royals lived

Once a hunting lodge for King Charles III, the Palazzo Reale di Capodimonte then became a posh royal home. It’s now the place to marvel at work by Neapolitan artists of the 17th and 18th centuries, and the King’s inherited Farnese collection, which includes portraits of royals by Titian. The royal apartments are quite something. Expect opulent chandeliers and furniture, exquisite tapestries and even a room lined completely with porcelain!