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Exhibition

Romy Schneider La Cinémathèque Française

16 Mar 2022 — 31 Jul 2022

40 years after her death, Romy Schneider (23 September 1938-29 May 1982) is still as beloved and popular as ever. The European actress, with a career that began in Germany and continued in France, became a star with films that forever marked the history of cinema.

However, the tragedy that marked the end of her life has taken precedence over what preceded it. The story of a woman as...

40 years after her death, Romy Schneider (23 September 1938-29 May 1982) is still as beloved and popular as ever. The European actress, with a career that began in Germany and continued in France, became a star with films that forever marked the history of cinema.

However, the tragedy that marked the end of her life has taken precedence over what preceded it. The story of a woman as a bundle of neuroses, prone to melancholy and desperate to the bone sells better to the media. Especially if she was stunningly beautiful and one of the greatest actresses in the history of cinema.

This exhibition shows how she became an icon. Find out who she was through her letters, her notes, and some of her testimonies to journalists – who she held in suspicion. She's been brought back to life through her roles, her texts, her radio and television interviews, her diary, and behind-the-scenes shoots.

Ultimately, her's is a human story. Always full of stage fright, of doubts, she never stopped questioning herself about her legitimacy, her game, her beauty.

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La Cinémathèque Française: Romy Schneider Exhibition

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Romy Schneider (Until 31 July 2022)

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La Cinémathèque Française

4.8 / 5 (248 reviews)

Located in a breathtaking postmodern building designed by Frank Gehry, the Cinémathèque Française is a French non-profit film organization that houses one of the largest archives of film documents and film-related objects in the world.

Alongside daily showings of global cinemas on their film screens, the museum is also home to the Méliès Museum which showcases the life of French cinematic pioneer George Méliès.

Opening hours

Saturday 11:00 - 20:00
Sunday 11:00 - 20:00
Monday 12:00 - 19:00
Tuesday Closed
Wednesday 12:00 - 19:00
Thursday 11:00 - 20:00
Friday 11:00 - 20:00

How to get there

La Cinémathèque Française
51 Rue de Bercy, 75012, Paris
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La Cinémathèque Française reviews

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