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Italy attractions

Things to do in Rome

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The Colosseum is a massive ancient amphitheater in the center of Rome. Picked apart by scavengers and ravaged by earthquakes and time, the Colosseum still stands as an impressive symbol of life in Ancient Rome. It showcases the power of past emperors and the durability of the Eternal City. This huge, marble and limestone structure was built to hold more than 50,000 spectators, all there to revel in the various forms of (mostly violent) entertainment, such as hunts, gladiator battles, and executions.
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Skip The Line Vatican Museums Tickets
4.7 / 5 (20627)
From $25.59
The Renaissance-era St Peter's Basilica is one of the largest churches in the world (and the home-church of the Pope). Highlights include the dome (the biggest in the world), Bernini's Baldacchino (the centerpiece of the church), and Michelangelo's Pietà (the only artwork he ever signed). For both the pious and the casual visitor, a trip to St. Peter's is an awe-inspiring trip into the heart of Vatican City.
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Built between 1609 and 1613, this opulent structure - fountains, gardens, pink marble walls, frescoed ceilings - seems ideally suited to house one of the world's best collections of art. And that was exactly what it was built for. Architect Flaminio Ponzio designed it for the cardinal and art collector Scipione Borghese, who wanted a party villa on the edge of town where he could house his enormous collection of priceless art. In 1901, the collection (and the gallery, and the park that surrounds it) was acquired by the Italian government, and opened to the public. As a museum, Galleria Borghese punches well above its weight with an impressive hit rate of masterpieces. Sculptures by Bernini and Canova, paintings, by Caravaggio, Raphael and Titian... the list goes on.
4.7 / 5 (2525)
From $24.23
The Leonardo Express is the easiest way to travel from Rome Fiumicino Airport to the center of the city. Book your airport shuttle ticket in advance and make the high-speed journey from Felice Santini station (attached to the airport) to Roma Termini Station. The Leonardo Express trains leave every 15 minutes, so you'll find your way to your Rome accommodation in rapid time!
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The towering cylinder of Castel Sant'Angelo, and its statue of Archangel Michael, is an instantly recognizable silhouette on the banks of the Tiber. Initially built as a mausoleum for Emperor Hadrian and his family, its purpose has changed many times over the years, from a fortress, a residence, a prison, and now a museum.
4.7 / 5 (1820)
From $14.54
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When Rome was Caput Mundi (Capital of the World), the Roman Forum was the very heart of the Roman Empire. Now a sprawling complex of ruins, it is here, a javelin's toss from the Colosseum, where everything happened: from making and enforcing laws to buying and selling exotic goods. Highlights include the Temple of Vesta, the Temple of Caesar, and the Senate House.
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Bioparco di Roma is an open-air zoological garden and biopark located on the original Villa Borghese estate in Rome. There are 1,114 animals of 222 species, spread across 17 hectares of gardens and enclosures.
4.6 / 5 (775)
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The Vatican Gardens are private urban gardens in the Vatican, covering an area of approximately 23 hectares (more than half of the country!). Established during the Renaissance and Baroque era, the gardens are decorated with typically ornate fountains and sculptures from these times. It is claimed that the foundation site of the Vatican Gardens was spread with sacred soil brought from Mount Calvary. Visiting the gardens requires booking a private tour, as no general public access is allowed.
4.6 / 5 (659)
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Things to do in Florence

For lovers of art and history, there is no more special place to visit than Florence's Uffizi Gallery. Open to the public since 1765, this former magistrate's office on the banks of the Arno welcomes some two million tourists a year. The Uffizi's collection is laid out in chronological order from the 13th up to the 17th century, so visitors get to experience the evolution of Italian art, from the introduction of realism and perspective of Cimabue and Giotto up to to the High Renaissance of Da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Raphael, and finally to the Baroque chiaroscuro of Caravaggio. A visit to the Uffizi is a unique chance to commune with the protagonists of the Italian Renaissance. When planning a trip here, always remember that the Uffizi Gallery is closed on Mondays.
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From $27.14
Visitors to Florence's Accademia Gallery invariably come for one reason – to see Michelangelo's magnificent statue of David. David has been on display here since 1873 along with the artist's Slaves and St. Matthew. On a trip to the Accademia – originally founded in the 1780s – you'll also be able to take in an important collection of Renaissance paintings by the likes of Botticelli and Ghirlandaio, see the remarkable original plaster cast of Giambologna's Rape of the Sabine Women, and the charming Museum of Musical Instruments.
4.7 / 5 (1931)
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Since it was opened to the public in 1436, Florence's most famous landmark, the Duomo (or Cattedrale di Santa Maria del Fiore) is a must-see city landmark. In fact, its towering size means you can't miss it. Filippo Brunelleschi's red-tiled dome is a wonder all on its own, but the architecture is as impressive inside as it is on the outside. Climbing to the top of this stunning cathedral affords great views of the city.
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The Duomo in Siena is ideally located in a piazza above the Piazza del Campo, easy to reach on foot and by public transport. This Gothic building houses treasures by the likes of Pisano, Donatello, and Michelangelo, as well as frescoes by Pinturicchio.
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Palazzo Pitti was built for Renaissance banker Luca Pitti. A loyal consigliere to Cosimo de Medici, Pitti wanted a mansion built to rival those of the mighty Medici. He did pretty well: about 100 years after its construction the Medici acquired it and moved in. With a grand courtyard, Royal Apartments, the Palatine Gallery and a high Baroque interior design, this is a worthy Renaissance palace.
4.7 / 5 (627)
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Originally conceived in the 16th century, the Boboli Gardens are now home to a remarkable 3,000-year old Egyptian obelisk, design features by leading architects such as Ammanati and Vasari, and eye-catching statues, grottoes, and fountains from the likes of Giambologna.
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The Medici Chapels were built by and for the Medici family, who bankrolled much of the Renaissance and ruled the Florentine Republic for generations. These two chapels belong to the Basilica of San Lorenzo - a church that dates back to the 4th century AD. In addition to being the burial place for 49 members of the Medici clan, these chapels contain three of Michelangelo's most beautiful sculptures.
4.6 / 5 (257)
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Bargello Museum (also known as Museo del Bargello) is one of the oldest buildings in Florence, dating back to 1255. What used to be a palace, as well as a prison and barracks, is now an art museum boasting a number of 16th-century sculptures, plus four masterpieces by Michelangelo (1475-1564) and Donatello's David.
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Housed in the 11th-century Palazzo Castellani, the Galileo Museum is dedicated to preserving the legacy of the eponymous scientist and astronomer and celebrating the contributions of Tuscany to modern science.
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Things to do in Venice

The Doge's Palace (Palazzo Ducale in Italian) is one of La Serenissima's most iconic landmarks. The first Doge's Palace was built on this spot in the 9th century but was destroyed by fire. The Gothic palace that stands in St. Mark's Square today dates back to the 14th century. It has undergone many refurbishments and upgrades over the years. Since the 16th century, it's been linked to the New Prison by the (in)famous Bridge of Sighs.
4.8 / 5 (2794)
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An enormous monument enriched with history, art, religion, and culture – to say the least! St Mark’s Basilica is made of impeccable treasures, inside out, from the 'Pala d'Oro' behind the altar, adorned in precious stones to the four horses on the façade that symbolize strength and freedom.
4.7 / 5 (1050)
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St. Mark's Bell Tower (Campanile di San Marco) is attached to St. Mark's Basilica in Venice, Italy. At 98.6 m tall, St. Mark's Bell Tower is the tallest structure in Venice, and was rebuilt in 1912 after its collapse in 1902.
4.8 / 5 (150)
From $14.54
As famous for its pigeons as it is for its history and culture, the Piazza San Marco is the unofficial capital of the watery city of Venice. With a multitude of attractions, including the towering Campanile, and transport links to the rest of the city, it's the perfect place to orient yourself, or just to take a break and observe the controlled chaos of city life.
4.3 / 5 (94)
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The Peggy Guggenheim Collection is one of the most important museums in Italy when it comes to European and American art from the first half of the 20th century. It's located in Venice at Palazzo Venier dei Leoni, on the Grand Canal, in what was once Peggy Guggenheim's home.
4.7 / 5 (254)
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The Teatro La Fenice in Venice is one of the most important landmarks in the history of Italian theater - and in the entire history of opera.
4.8 / 5 (292)
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You can show your digital tickets at any one of the 14 Churches of the Circuit (except FRARI) in exchange for your Chorus pass, which grants you one admission to each of the 14 churches. A good one to start at is the Chiesa di Santa Maria del Giglio, which features the work of Giuseppe Sardi on its facade, and Peter Paul Rubens' "Virgin Mary and Child with Saint Giovannino" on the inside.
4.0 / 5 (4)
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The Palazzo Contarini del Bovolo is a small and characteristic palazzo in Venice, Italy. It's best known for its 15th-century staircase, the Scala Contarini del Bovolo.
4.5 / 5 (104)
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The Chiesa di San Vidal is a spectacular concert hall situated at one end of the Campo Santo Stefano in Venice. It's the location for concerts by Interpreti Veneziani, a world class ensemble who perform the likes of Mozart and Bach on the former altar.
4.9 / 5 (104)
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Things to do in Milan

You'll be thoroughly impressed as you approach Italy's largest church, the Duomo di Milano, also known as Milan Cathedral. At 108-meters high, 160-meters long, and 92-meters wide, it easily holds 40,000 people. Every inch of it is dripping with gothic gravitas. The true magnitude of the Duomo di Milano truly hits you when you're inside. It is adorned with artwork and religious ornaments, and you can see sarcophagi of luminaries from centuries gone by. It is also home to Italy's largest organ, which clocks in at a whopping 15,350 pipes.
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From $8.72
Huge and filled with experiments on subjects from energy to communication, this is 50,000 m2 of investigation into science and technology, with 16,000 historical objects and 13 interactive laboratories. The National Museum Science and Technology Leonardo da Vinci covers all things science, so if you're looking to sate your curiosity – pick up your tickets here.
4.6 / 5 (333)
From $9.69
The attractions at Milan's Museum of Illusions span over 70 exhibits and cover different fields, including psychology, mathematics, science, and biology. But nothing is as it seems! It's all about the mind trickery in this central Milan location. Take the whole family and the camera too – there are photo opps galore in here! Milan is the 33rd city in the world to host one of these popular attractions designed for international audiences of all ages. It's located in via Settembrini 11, a few steps away from Milan Central Station.
4.3 / 5 (3323)
From $17.45
Inaugurated on 3 August 1778, La Scala is an impressive and romantic opera house in Milan. The theater has played host to some of the world's most talented performers, and numerous operas and ballets.
4.4 / 5 (377)
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A.C. Milan is one of the world’s great football clubs, and this museum combines 115 years of glittering success with a modern and innovative use of multimedia technology. Get to know club and world greats like Franco Baresi and Marco Van Basten in the Hall of Fame, and explore the Trophies Room – A.C. Milan have won seven European club championships and numerous Italian ones. Interactive displays are featured throughout and the highlight is the holographic theater, where the likes of Paolo Maldini will appear to come to life!
4.8 / 5 (159)
From $14.54
Milan Malpensa Airport is a major international airport located 49 kilometres northwest of central Milan, serving roughly 22 million passengers a year.
4.8 / 5 (60)
From $9.69
This 15th-century church and Dominican convent is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The popular attraction features Leonardo da Vinci's fresco The Last Supper in its refectory - one of the most important artworks of the whole Renaissance.
4.2 / 5 (109)
From $5.82
Located in the center of the city, Leonardo3 is an exhibition space with worldwide premieres, new technologies, and working models of more than 200 of da Vinci's inventions. This interactive museum and research center brings the past to life using innovative technology.
4.5 / 5 (147)
From $13.57
The Biblioteca Ambrosiana is a historic library in Milan, Italy, named after Ambrose, the patron saint of the city. It was founded in 1609 by Cardinal Federico Borromeo, and is home to the Pinacoteca Ambrosiana art gallery, where masterpieces from Leonardo da Vinci, Botticelli, Raphael, and Caravaggio are found.
4.7 / 5 (123)
From $15.99
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