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Hamburg

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Planning your Hamburg visit

Language

German

Currency

Euro (€)

Dialing code

+49

Time zone

Central European Time (CET)

A growing city

With a growing reputation as one of of the coolest cities in the world, Germany’s second-biggest city and largest port makes for a bubbling melting pot of internationals. The sea-facing buildings make atmospheric spots for some of the country’s best restaurants, while parts of the Reeperbahn red-light district rival those found in Amsterdam. Hamburg is famed for its classical music, and locals are proud of their concert hall, the Elbphilharmonie. But music festivals all year round, and the pulsing nightlife prove the scene today is more dynamic. Want to see for yourself? Look for the nightclub that used to be a WWII bunker.

Getting around

If you’re a culture vulture with a big to-do list, it’s a good idea to get yourself a day pass and take advantage of all of Hamburg’s convenient public transport. Public buses cover the whole city across several different lines, while the ferry system can offer a scenic alternative. Ferries glide their way every 15 minutes, all day, along the Elbe and between HafenCity and Teufelsbrück. The U-Bahn and S-Bahn trains are simple to figure out and will take you everywhere else. But even when they stop for the evening, you don’t have to - just look for the handy night buses.

Weather & when to go

There’s lots to keep you busy in happening Hamburg all year round. Boasting excellent museums and indoor activities, the city will keep you warm and cozy all winter when temperatures are hovering around the freezing mark. In the summer, soak up some rays in the beautiful parks, or take a stroll around the waterfront where the warehouses and grain elevators of old are now stunning apartments and shopping areas. Ride a boat while the weather is at its best. Summer temperatures average in the high 80's to low 70's F, but it can rain sporadically so always take an umbrella in your bag, just in case.

What to do in Hamburg for 3 days

Decks and wrecks at the International Maritime Museum

Hamburg's maritime history awaits inside the oldest surviving storage building in the Port of Hamburg, now a sprawling museum across nine decks. Get your fix of nautical history and count how many LEGO bricks it took to build their special version of the Queen Mary II. See how you fare at sailing on the 'steering wheel' simulator, but watch out for the pirates! Journey through maritime progress from antiquity to the 20th century and watch a timelapse movie of a ship being built. This is one fun museum for wannabe sailors of all ages.

Germany’s biggest clock bell at St. Michael's Church Hamburg

One of Hamburg's landmark churches is the proud host of Germany's biggest clock bell. You’ll get some of the best views of Hamburg and harbor views from heights of 106 meters above the Elbe River from the tower. As one of the most impressive Hanseatic Protestant baroque churches in Europe, this historic building has seen and survived many catastrophes, from lightning strikes to unfortunate fires, and unspeakable tragedies during WWII.

Treat your eyes and ears at Elbphilharmonie

One of the world's most acoustically-advanced concert halls, which is actually home to three concert venues, is often filled with people simply looking to snap those amazing Elbe River views. The iceberg-shaped building itself reflects in the water and when the weather is good, the outdoor terrace makes the perfect place for some people-watching in the sunshine. The biggest venue in the Elbphilharmonie can host over 2,000 people. Why not make some musical Hamburg memories and catch a performance, too?

Fall under the art spell at Kunsthalle

Just a short walk from the Hauptbahnhof, between the Binnenalster and Außenalster, sits one of Germany’s biggest and best museums. Construction of the Kunsthalle was funded by Hamburg’s citizens, and this gigantic art gallery opened to fanfare in 1869. You could spend all day in here exploring all kinds of amazing art. There’s work by the masters, including Goya, Rembrandt, Rubens and Canaletto, plus 19th-century luminaries like Manet, Degas and Gauguin. Modern and contemporary fans will enjoy Franz Marc, Francis Bacon, Warhol, Tracey Emin and Picasso.