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Bourse de Commerce - Pinault Collection Tickets

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Bourse de Commerce - Pinault Collection: Timed Entrance

  • Audio guide in English and 5 other languages
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Bourse de Commerce - Pinault Collection: Day Ticket

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About: Bourse de Commerce - Pinault Collection

Bourse de Commerce - Pinault Collection is a contemporary art haven, the fruit of a collaboration between renowned art collector Francois Pinault and Pritzker Prize-winning architect Tadao Ando.

This 30,000-square-foot museum, a renovation of Paris's domed, 18th-century corn exchange, is one of the city's newest major museums, costing almost $200 million to realize. Hosting 10 or more temporary exhibitions per year, visitors can expect to see a wealth of famous works by the world's greatest contemporary artists, as well as high-profile loans from notable institutions around the globe.

Sunday 11:00 - 19:00
Monday 11:00 - 19:00
Tuesday Closed
Wednesday 11:00 - 19:00
Thursday 11:00 - 19:00
Friday 11:00 - 21:00
Saturday 11:00 - 21:00
Bourse de Commerce - Pinault Collection
2 Rue de Viarmes, 75001, Paris
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